My sheep is soooo fat!

15 Mar

Every Sunday for the last 6 weeks, we are asked the same question “Any lambs yet?”. No, she is still fat, although it did not seem possible that she is even wider than last week!
On our farm, we have raised Bummer Lambs and been blessed with the lost, little ones thriving. The combination of children’s prayers, hard work, fresh raw Goat’s milk and a Lot of Love are a reckoning force united!
The children enjoyed raising the lambs so much that last year that when a new friend from church called one afternoon asking us to take in a “Bummer Ram Lamb” we did not hesitate! After several months, he was so infatuated with our goats that we were on the search for a species similar companion for him. The Goaty Girlz were getting quite annoyed with his constant bleating and his lovingly following them around from sunrise until dusk!
Our friend Sarah gave us Lambie (Now a 200# ram!) offered to free lease us an ewe unrelated to him until after she kidded in the spring. We were enthralled and asked a friend Sam who owns a truck and canopy to transport the living link to our future flock.
Sam arrived at our farm and we drove over to pick the sheep up.
Let me enlighten you by what transpired when we went to bring her home. Most people who raise sheep for meat, only have their sheep handled once or twice a year for shearing, vaccinations, deworming and feet trimming. I had purchased a book on Sheep and read many sources to ready for this new venture. Even though I spent hours researching raising sheep, I never thought that other farms would not raise sheep like our Lambie! This sheep of ours can be summoned anytime of anyday by just walking outside and talking over by the pasture. He comes running, tail wagging and face turned up anticipating a scratch or treat. Knowing he is a “Ram”, he is not led around and we set up feed while they are locked out to keep him sweet and not too demanding or give him opportunities to get rammy!
It was a beautiful, unseasonably warm fall day and the first red flag was as soon as we pulled up the driveway we were greeted with “park over here and don’t let the sheep see you!”.
I figured we would have to treat them so we could shut the pasture gate as it was the middle of the afternoon and usually they would of been out grazing. Next, Sarah who owns the sheep proceeds to rip me a new one because we didn’t call right before we left! I apologized and was thinking to myself that I had just talked to her less than 2 hours before and I had called already, but oh well!
Now, I almost forgot to mention that my friend “Sam”who owns the truck with canopy confesses to me on the drive over that he is afraid of sheep! I burst out laughing hysterically because he is a tall man who looks like he can take care of himself! He did not grow up on a farm or have much exposure to sheep except while strolling in a childhood friends’ pasture a ram suddenly appeared who chased them everywhere.
We were standing over behind the barn when I heard “okay, you need to come help, I have her!” exclaimed Sarah.
As we come round the corner, we glanced at each other and ran towards her. Sam is directed out into the yard to the other side of the feeder. I quickly grab a hold of the rope that my spry, grey lady friend is grasping. Looking down into the stanchion is a lovely ewe who is clearly terrified! A rope is noosed around her neck and Sam looks at her, not knowing what to do next.
Sarah yells at him “get her on the ground and put the lead around her, then go get the truck!” I run around to where the ewe is bucking, snorting and frantically trying to get away as if she is in fear of her life! Sam has obviously overcome his fear and as gently as possible puts his knee on her and rolls her over as she is still kicking and trying to turn to get up. We succeed in getting a lead around her neck and convince her to buck her way towards the truck.
When we reach the tailgate, Sam reaches down and grabs fleece at the nape of her neck and hips and picks her up and puts her in the truck.
With lightening speed he pulls the canopy hatch closed and we simultaneously wonder if this ewe settle down as she wildly runs around inside of the closed canopy. Sam reaches in and slides the windows to keep her safe and ventilated on the way home.
We say our thank you s and pile in the truck, and I nervously peek behind us at our new addition to the farm. She finally stops and stands in the corner during the ride. She is a nice looking ewe with huge gold-colored eyes and a beautiful fleece that has multi colors woven through it. Sarah says she is a Cheviot and Icelandic cross and Icelandics are famous for the soft, long beautiful fleeces they sport.
surprisingly, she jumps right out of the truck and compared to the first introduction to this sheep named Diane she is easily led to the barn. Since I knew the owners of this sheep and how healthy their flock, I did not quarantine her. Ironically my Mom’s name was Diane, my children think this is so funny!

Now almost six months have passed and yes, my sheep is still soooo fat that Sarah says she may have triplets!

Lambie smiling

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One Response to “My sheep is soooo fat!”

  1. Jen Cave March 30, 2013 at 1:56 am #

    Ugh! update your blog already! 🙂

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